Number of times a KM output is reprinted/reproduced/replicated by recipients

Indicator Number: 
18
Category: 
Logic Model Component: 
Data Type(s): 
Count
Short Definition: 

Collects the number of specific cases an organization or independent body—other than the one that originally authored, funded, produced, or sponsored a KM output—decides to use its own resources to copy or excerpt all or part of the KM output

Definition and Explanation (Long): 

This indicator collects the number of specific cases in which an organization or independent body—other than the one that originally authored, funded, produced, or sponsored a KM output—decides to use its own resources to copy or excerpt all or part of the KM output.

“Reprint” is a term specific to publications and other print resources, while “reproduction” can apply to products and services, and “replication” can refer to approaches and techniques. Thus, the number refers not only to print copies, but also to online copies in any online medium or even any other KM events or approaches.

Data Requirements: 

Quantitative data from requests for approval or permission to reprint, reproduce, or replicate, which indicate the number of items produced and, if applicable, which parts of those documents; and/or copies or other evidence of reprinting, reproduction, or replication.

Data Sources: 

Administrative records, letters, emails, communication of request and acknowledgment, or receipts and online pages that track use and downloads of web-based products, such as open source content management systems

Frequency of Data Collection: 
Quarterly
Purpose: 
Reprints, reproductions, and replicated approaches demonstrate demand for a particular KM output and extend the reach of the output beyond what was originally feasible.
Issues and Challenges: 
An added value of this indicator is that a desire to reprint, reproduce, or replicate suggests an independent judgment that the KM output is useful and of high quality. A limitation of this indicator is that the original publishers or developers have to rely on what is reported or sent to them or what they happen to come across after reprinting and reproduction. It is not possible to know with certainty the extent of reprinting and reproduction, as some re-publishers think they would not receive permission to reprint, so they do not tell the original publisher their materials are being used. Also, it may be difficult to find out the extent of dissemination, the identity of the recipients, or the use of the reprint. These limitations apply to both online and print media.
Indicator Snapshots: 

OpenAid is a website platform designed and built by the USAID-funded the Knowledge for Health Project to help small non-governmental organizations and international development projects quickly create cost-effective, program-focused websites (http://drupal.org/project/openaid). OpenAid was released in July 2012. As of June 2013, 60 different sites were using the OpenAid platform.

Pages in the Guide: 
37-38
Published Year: 
  • 2013
Last Updated Date: 
Wednesday, September 6, 2017